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Lithium’s DevOps Transformation

Lithium Alumni (Retired) Lithium Alumni (Retired)
Lithium Alumni (Retired)

Next week, I’m headed to London to enjoy the balmy British weather, indulge in more than my fair share of fried food, and maybe even watch some cricket…the game on which baseball is based. Yup, I went there.

 

That sounds like fun, but the main reason I am going is because I have been asked to host a session at IP Expo Europe on Lithium’s transformation to DevOps. Prepping for my talk has been an interesting process, as it has prompted me (and the team) to take a step back and think about how far we’ve come in our transition, what prompted us to do this in the first place, why we’re doing it, and what – in hindsight – we would have done differently.

 

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As far as why, it all comes down to speed right? I believe in synchronicity and that that multiple folks have the same idea at the same time. The one who succeeds is the one who is able to execute better and faster. It may sound overly simplistic but speed as a competitive differentiator is going to continue to grow even more important… the ability to iterate swiftly and focus on the right areas that will deliver the most value to the customer. DevOps is a key enabler in helping R&D teams go faster and execute better. There is strong data that is available that shows that companies leveraging DevOps are much more likely to succeed.

 

Our shift to DevOps has not been easy and there is a lot more to be done, but I’m proud of how far we’ve come. A few years ago, we were a very traditional engineering organization. Operations owned maintenance and we had some big silos and there was growing frustration about not being able to go faster. We were early in the industry to start moving towards Hybrid Cloud and DevOps. But by embracing DevOps, we are now seeing increased collaboration across the organization and it has put us in a much better position to move faster and more efficiently.

 

With big transformations like this, it is never smooth sailing. I’ve personally learned a few things like how hard it is to transition large applications, needing to balance the need to be prescriptive vs giving teams independence, and the importance of not trying to “boil the ocean” and do too much at once when you have a big vision.

  

I will report back after the conference on how everything went. If there is anything you think I should call out specifically in the session feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments.

 

Want more info on my session at IP Expo? Click here.

 

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About the Author
Worked in a variety of large companies such as Oracle, Cisco etc and several startups. Proud father and husband and huge foodie!